The glass slipper or the glass ceiling

I recently finished reading The Meaning of Wife. It provocatively looked at the roles of women, more specifically the role of being a “wife” in the past as well as the present. The book discussed everything from the the abuse rates of wives, to wives that murder their husbands. What I found most alarming was the inequality in this day and age between men and women. It’s 2014!

Here’s the link to the book on Amazon

and here is the link for the Kindle version

They are sad stats but here they are:

Women are more educated than men

14.6% of top executive positions in fortune 500 companies are held by women in 2013

Women are still earning 25% less than their male counterparts

So my question is does the class ceiling exist? Some argue no, that women who want to climb their way to the top will but most definitely at a price – perhaps family. Sadly, some employers will promote you faster if you don’t have children, because for them, it’s a business and if you don’t have children, you have more time to dedicate to work. This however is not the case with men. In fact men that are father’s are typically paid more than a man in the same role without a family.

While I wouldn’t consider myself a feminist, it really does bug me when there isn’t equality in the work force.

I know there are a lot of women out there that are 100% against marriage because they believe marriage will force them to become some domestic-goddess and will degrade their worth, or something like that…. I don’t however believe that. Perhaps I’m not as tainted as some, perhaps I’m naive, or maybe, just maybe it’s because I’ve found a partner that will love and support me not matter what my choices are. The women that have the extremest views are painting a bad picture, in my mind at least, for the crusade of equality.

Screen Shot 2014-03-04 at 8.47.24 PM

When it comes down to it I want to be able to have both (don’t we all); my glass slipper and fairytale ending as well as a fulfilling career that includes rising though the ranks of the corporate ladder.

We all want it all, and then the question becomes… what defines your all?

I believe it truly is tougher for women then for men to climb the corporate ladder, but I’ve seen my own mother do it, and I’m hoping I’m not far behind. My thoughts are it comes down to two main things:

1) Educating yourself on the topic and fighting for what you deserve. We aren’t going to be able to move mountains over night but if women start standing up for their worth and learning more about the inequality then we should be able to take a few steps in the right direction.

2) Having a supportive partner. This is probably as important (if not more important) than my first point. Without someone to support your goals and dreams as well as understand the constant societal pressures you face, you simply won’t be able to do it. Or at the very least you will become exceedingly frustrated while trying to accomplish everything. Having that person that supports you if you decide to go for a c-suite position or if you decide to stay home is vital. Like I said earlier, my mom rose through the ranks of the company she works for but my dad made a lot of sacrifices. He was home at 5pm everyday to make dinner and took care of us when mom was out of town on business. Without him, she couldn’t of had her all which was a fulfilling career and a loving family.

So now I’m wondering, what defines you all, how do you plan on achieving it and do you believe there is a disconnect between men and women in the workforce?

Comments

  1. I absolutely classify myself as a feminist, and I think you do too if you used the newer generations definition. The fact that you said you get bugged about inequality in the workplace is a big part of it! Personally, I don’t connect with the “man-hating” definition of the 70′s, and I think that is what many still see as feminism. I can wear my pretty things for me and still be aware and outspoken about the disparity between men and women.

    I’m intent on climbing up the chain, though, as of yet I am unsure of the sacrifices that might mean. I also hate the idea that one half of a relationship generally has to be the “trailing partner” to have the other one reach those goals, but I understand it is generally a reality. I am fine with the one partner taking a career “back seat” if that is what they want, but what if both halves are very much interested in upward mobility, and they want a family? They make it work, with modifications on the traditional family.

    • I most definitely agree with you, the only thing is that it would also bug me if men were paid less than women (which they aren’t) and that’s sort of why I don’t see myself as a feminist. I believe it should just be equal! I think both the bf and I are intent on wanting to climb the corporate ladder, and I don’t know the implications it will have down the road for our family

  2. I HATE when women don’t want to call themselves feminists. Anyone who has ever started a sentence ‘I’m not a feminist, but…’ fails in my books. Yes, I can see why they don’t identity with some of the more extreme feminists and no, we shouldn’t NEED feminism in this day and age but the basic tenet of feminism is EQUALITY and it still does not exist.

Speak Your Mind

*